High School Lesson Plans

These lesson plans have been developed specifically for high school students.

Lesson Plans By SC Educators

The Media & Civil Rights in America

This website examines the Montgomery Bus Boycott, the Selma to Montgomery Marches, and the 1963 Birmingham Demonstrations, to see how the media was instrumental in drawing attention to the plight of African-Americans during this time.

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Where is the Love?

This lesson uses primary sources  to understand the historical context of Martin Luther King Jr.’s “I Have a Dream” and Nelson Mandela’s “Glory and Hope” speeches. 

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Civil Rights Document Based Question

Students will study the Civil Rights Movement in the U.S. and analyze primary source documents addressing the following questions: How were African Americans denied equal rights? What steps did individuals and groups take to fight for civil rights? What steps did the United States government take in the fight for civil rights? 

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Civil Discourse: Respecting Diverse Beliefs and Opinions in a Partisan Society

Students will read “A Raisin in the Sun” by Lorraine Hansberry and will participate in a variety of activities using Primary Sources to discuss race, sex, religion, gender, and socio-economic bias and prejudice.

Library of Congress Civil Rights Lesson Plans

After Reconstruction: Problems of African Americans in the South

In this lesson, students use the collection’s Timeline of African American History, 1852-1925 to identify problems and issues facing African Americans immediately after Reconstruction.

Segregation: From Jim Crow to Linda Brown

Students identify problems and issues facing African-Americans immediately after Reconstruction using text based sources.

Baseball, Race Relations and Jackie Robinson

Students explore racism in the United States, both in and out of sports. The lesson focuses primarily on race relations in the 1950s.

Baseball, Race and Ethnicity: Rounding the Bases

Students use primary sources focused on baseball to explore the American experience regarding race and ethnicity.

To Kill a Mockingbird: A Historical Perspective

Students gain a sense of the living history that surrounds the novel To Kill a Mockingbird. Students may better grasp how historical events and human forces have shaped relationships between black and white, and rich and poor cultures of our country.

African American Identity in the Gilded Age

Examine the tension experienced by African-Americans as they struggled to establish a vibrant and meaningful identity based on the promises of liberty and equality in the midst of a society that was ambivalent towards them and sought to impose an inferior definition upon them.